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How we can deal with burnout

Written by Lauren Groff Published on     4 mins read

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According to statistics, around 67% of all US employees report some degree of burnout, and the same symptoms affect around 2.7 million German employees.

About two years ago, I burned out. Big Time.

Verging on a mental breakdown, I had bills coming out of my ears from a debt my ex-husband left me. Clients were breathing down the neck of the failing company I was working for. I had health scares and was rapidly reaching a breaking point. It had been a long time coming, years in fact, but finally, I reached a point where I felt like I was going to fall apart at the seams.

Employee burnout is increasingly common these days, yet it’s still seemingly a taboo subject. We’re expected to work harder each day, produce more, and get more done in all areas of our lives, personally and professionally, socially, and in our downtime. It’s too much, and it’s having such a huge effect on businesses.

According to statistics, around 67% of all US employees report some degree of burnout, and the same symptoms affect around 2.7 million German employees, so it’s safe to say this is a problem affecting everyone around the world.

When you consider that the same statistics state that burnout is causing between an estimated $125 to $190 billion in health-care bills, including being a major cause of death for under 45s, this is a serious problem that businesses and employees need to start taking seriously.

The Causes of Employee Burnout

Of course, everyone is different, and some causes are going to affect some people more than others, but there does seem to be general causes that affect people to varying degrees. Some of the most common include things like:

  • Being treated unfairly at work
  • Not being clear on an employee’s job role
  • Not being able to manage the expected workload
  • Adding unachievable time pressures
  • A lack of communication throughout the workplace
  • A lack of support from managerial roles

Did some of these causes surprise you? While some of these may sound simple, it’s usually these causes affecting an individual over a long period of time or a mixture of multiple causes. When you chuck in the stresses of everyday life outside of work as well, then you get a serious problem.

“With poor mental health, your employees won’t be happy, will consider leaving, won’t be as productive, will get ill and take time off more often, and won’t be working to their full potential while they are at work. If you can fix the problem, you’ll be creating an environment for happy and productive employees that will massively contribute to the success of your business,” explains Ben McDonald, a writer at State Of Writing and Ukservicesreviews.

Can your business afford not to think about this?

Employee burnout has been more prevalent than ever in businesses. Photo by Anna Tarazevich from Pexels

How to Fix the Employee Burnout Problem

The very first thing you need to do is become aware of whether there’s an employee burnout problem in your business at all, which means looking out for the signs. Have some employees become far less productive than they used to be? Do they constantly look tired and exhausted? Are they losing their relationships with customers that they used to be really successful with? Are your employees beginning to not be as communicative?

These are all signs you have a problem manifesting within the ranks.

The best thing you can do here is to start an open conversation with your employees. You can do this individually with employees you’re worried about by asking them how they’re feeling, whether they need any support, and overall just saying that you are there to help your employees if they need it.

However, it’s much better to openly have the conversation with all your employees because you never know who is going to be affected by burnout, and when someone may need that little extra support, perhaps not now, but later down the line.

“Once the conversation has started, you’ll need to start thinking about changes you can make. For example, do you need to start setting more manageable workloads to your team, or making deadlines more achievable?” shares Nikki Harper, an HR at Assignment Help and Revieweal.

“The trick is to highlight areas of concern within your business and then make actionable changes that will yield positive results.”


Lauren Groff is a writer at Custom Essay and Big Assignments. She used to work in HR but now is proactive in helping businesses develop their employee culture and turn it into the most successful one possible. Also, she is a career consultant at Best Essay Writing Services.

Disclaimer: This article was written by a contributor. All content is written by and reflects the personal perspective of the writer. If you’d like to contribute, you can apply here

WRITTEN BY

Lauren Groff

Lauren Groff is a writer at Custom Essay and Big Assignments. She used to work in HR but now is proactive in helping businesses develop their employee culture and turn it into the most successful one possible. Also, she is a career consultant at Best Essay Writing Services.

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